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Pachyphytum   Link 1841

Pachyphytum is a genus of 15 small rosetted succulents with fleshy, smooth leaves. New plants are readily propagated from leaf or stem cuttings. These plants are found growing in rocky mountains of Eastern central Mexico. Pachyphytum is closely related to Echeveria.

pachyphytum glutinicaule

Pachyphytum glutinicaule  Moran 1963 (Sticky Moonstones)
The obovate leaves with pointed tips are lavendar-grey with a farinose coating which is easily rubbed off. The younger parts of the stems are sticky and ensnare small insects. The inflorescence is a red, drooping petiole carrying at its end a raceme of pink bells emerging from grey-green sepals.
 
Native to the Mexican states of Hildago and Queretaro where it grows on North-facing cliffs of river gorges.

pachyphytum aduncum pachyphytum hookeri

Pachyphytum hookeri  (Salm-Dyck) Berger 1930  Syn. P. aduncum Rose 1905
The grey-brown stems carry an irregular cluster of blue-green ovate leaves towards their ends. The white coating on the leaves is easily washed off. A raceme of pink flowers with yellow centres and pink sepals is produced on a long pink flower stem.

Found on rock cliffs at elevations of 6000-7500ft in San Luis Potosi. This plant needs full or diffuse sun to grow with a compact habit and develop the proper colour. Various forms are in cultivation including one with bright green leaves and a cristate form.

pachyphytum longifolium

Pachyphytum longifolium  Rose 1905
The gray-green oblanceolate leaves have swollen or pointed tips. Their farinose coating is easily rubbed off. The inflorescence is a red, drooping petiole carrying at it's end a raceme of red bells held within grey sepals.
 
Native to the Mexican state of Hildago where it grows on the rocky side of a steep gorge. Some selected clones in cultivation have much longer leaves than the average.

pachyphytum oviferum

Pachyphytum oviferum  Purpus 1919 (Sugar Almond Plant)
The greenish-white stems of this prostrate plant carry rosettes of pale glaucous blue to purplish rounded leaves near the growing points. The 1ft red flowering stems carry a drooping raceme of up to 15 reddish flowers with a yellow centre, yellow stamens and blue-grey sepals.

Known from a single location, growing on rock cliffs at an elevation of 3900ft in San Luis Potosi. This plant needs full or diffuse sun to grow with a compact habit and develop the proper colour. The leaves tend to fall off easily although they can be used for propagation as leaf cuttings. The glaucous-white coating is spoiled by overhead watering or the slightest touch so growing a perfect plant is a challenge.